THE PORT AUTHORITY OF NY & NJ

Press Release Article


RIDERSHIP SURGES AT EXCHANGE PLACE PATH STATION A YEAR AFTER IT REOPENED FOLLOWING SEPTEMBER 11 ATTACKS

Date: Jun 29, 2004
Press Release Number: 88-2004

Ridership at Key Jersey City Station Doubles, Nearing Pre-9/11 Levels


Ridership has doubled at the Port Authority’s Exchange Place PATH Station in Jersey City, N.J., since the Port Authority reopened it last June and restored a critical transportation link for the region that had been severed by the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The 11,200 weekday riders who now use Exchange Place exceed the agency projection for the first year by about 1,400 riders. After Exchange Place reopened on June 30, 2003, it handled an average of 5,600 weekday riders during the first month of operation. More than 15,000 weekday commuters used the station before September 11, 2001.

New Jersey Governor James E. McGreevey said, “These numbers are a clear indication that the region’s economy is on the rebound, which requires continued investment in the region’s transportation network. New Jersey residents are continuing to use PATH to commute to and from Manhattan, and travelers also are using the system to go to and from bustling employment centers along Jersey City’s Gold Coast.”

New York Governor George E. Pataki said, “As our economy continues to rebound, it is critical that we continue to invest in our transportation infrastructure. Transportation will continue to drive our region’s recovery, and we already have seen clear evidence of that in the more than 33,000 people who take PATH to and from the World Trade Center PATH Station each day.”

Port Authority Chairman Anthony R. Coscia said, “The $566 million we spent to restore the PATH system has proven to be a fruitful investment. Our investment in an integrated regional transportation network, under Governor McGreevey’s leadership, will help to promote continuing economic recovery and job growth throughout the New York-New Jersey region.”

Port Authority Executive Director Joseph J. Seymour said, “Restoration of our Exchange Place and World Trade Center PATH stations was a critical first step in the rebuilding of the World Trade Center site. We need an integrated transportation network that includes PATH, New York City subways, buses and ferries to handle travelers who live and work in Manhattan, and those who plan to visit the Memorial at the World Trade Center site.”

The reopening of Exchange Place cleared the way for the reopening five months later of the temporary World Trade Center Station.

Following the September 11 attacks, the Port Authority was forced to close the Exchange Place PATH Station because it suffered some flooding damage and was not designed to serve as a terminal station.

The majority of the work under the $160 million Exchange Place restoration project involved the construction of new crossover tunnels, along with new track work, to allow the station to serve as a terminal. In addition, the station’s platforms were extended to accommodate up to 10-car trains.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey operates many of the busiest and most important transportation links in the region. They include John F. Kennedy International, Newark Liberty International, LaGuardia and Teterboro airports; AirTrain JFK and AirTrain Newark; the George Washington Bridge; the Lincoln and Holland tunnels; the three bridges between Staten Island and New Jersey; the PATH (Port Authority Trans-Hudson) rapid-transit rail system; the Port Authority-Downtown Manhattan Heliport; Port Newark; the Elizabeth-Port Authority Marine Terminal; the Howland Hook Marine Terminal on Staten Island; the Brooklyn Piers/Red Hook Container Terminal; and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in midtown Manhattan. The agency also owns the 16-acre World Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan. The Port Authority is financially self-supporting and receives no tax revenue from either state.